September 25, 2017

Afghanistan Solutions Still Evade US

Afghanistan

After 16 years in Afghanistan, the US still has no strategy for winning or exiting this war. And that’s the opinion of the military, the administration, and congress.

Competition Grows for Attack Aircraft

Attack Aircraft

There has been interest in the past few years in fleet replacements for the Joint Strike Fighter. The number of ongoing or potential competitions for fighters, bombers, and attack aircraft is 54 worldwide.

Is Trump’s F-35 a Mistake or Deal Maker?

F-35 costs rise

Industry analysts are trying to calibrate the F-35’s future from Trump’s F-35 tweets that it’s cost is ‘out of control’ and word of a multi-year block buy if Lockheed does not protest a buy of F/A-18s from Boeing.

McMaster Choice as Security Adviser Earns Praise

President Trump’s choice for national security adviser, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster is earning praise. He’s been called the “smartest and most capable military officer of his generation, one who has not only led American victories on the battlefields of the 1991 Gulf War and of the Iraq War, but also holds a Ph.D. in history.”

First US & Russian Military Meet-up Since ’14

Russian

the top US and Russian generals will meet today, Thursday in Azerbaijan, the first meeting since military cooperation was suspended in 2014 amid Russian aggression in Ukraine.

Confrontations Escalate in Persian Gulf

Iran escalates confrontations with US warships in the Persian Gulf.

Obama: Troops Will Remain in Afghanistan

New realities lead to the president’s decision to leave a force in Afghanistan.

Are Radar Advances Gaining on Stealth Shields?

Advances in radar technology may be chipping away at stealth’s low visibility.

Blue Angels Return to Work

The Blue Angels will resume performances July 2 at the National Cherry Festival Air Show in Traverse City, MI, reports Navy Times. A month ago one of their pilots was killed in a crash while practicing for an air show.

Orlando Shooter Worked For Counterterrorism Firm

Discovery that the shooter in the Orlando nightclub massacre worked for a counterterrorism firm calls into question how wisely security dollars are being spent.